Verse and verse

Verse and verse are two formal elements of poetic composition . A stanza is called each of the parts into which a poem is divided and in turn they are composed, depending on the type of poem, by a certain number of verses.

The verses are sets of words that follow a rhythm and specific rules.

Next we will know the differences between verse and stanza.

StanzaTo
Definitioneach of the parts into which certain poetic compositions are dividedsets of words that follow a specific rhythm and rules.
Characteristics-They have to be made up of two or more verses.

-A metric scheme must be used to be able to visualize its measurement and its rhyme.

-The forms it can take are indefinite.

-A poem may have an indefinite number of stanzas.

-The verse is the basic unit of a poem

-There may be rhymes between one verse and another

-They have rhythm and measure according to the number of their poetic syllables.

-It has a pause at the end, and in the cases of compound verses its internal pause is called caesura.

 

Classifications -Isometric: are those in which the verses have the same number of syllables.

-Heterometric: are those in which their verses do not have the same number of syllables.

-Simple verses: it has eleven syllables or less, which implies that it does not have an internal division or a pause.

-Compound verses: they have more than twelve syllables, which implies that if it has a division or internal pause.

What is the stanza?

Each of the parts into which certain poetic compositions are divided is known as a stanza . These stanzas in turn are composed of verses and are subject to certain rules that are related to meter , rhythm and rhyme .

The stanzas can be distinguished since they are separated from each other in the form of paragraphs.

The word stanza derives from the Greek strophe, which means “to turn” and is attributed to when the Greek choir sang in the works while moving from one side of the scene to the other.

For a stanza to form, it takes at least two verses. In turn, they are classified according to the number of verses and the rhythm they have within the poem.

Characteristics of stanzas

Among its main characteristics we find:

-They have to be made up of two or more verses.

-A metric scheme must be used to be able to visualize its measurement and its rhyme .

-The forms it can take are indefinite.

-They can be isometric ( that is, verses that have the same number of syllables) or they can be heterometric (that is, verses that have different numbers of syllables).

-A poem may have an indefinite number of stanzas.

Types of stanzas

There are several ways in which stanzas and verse combinations can be presented. The two types of stanzas can be:

– Isometric : are those in which the verses have the same number of syllables.

– Heterometric: are those in which their verses do not have the same number of syllables.

The most common classical stanzas are: the quatrain (of four lines), the limerick (of five lines), the eighth (of eight lines) and the tenth (of ten lines).

It should be noted that stanzas are not only present in poetry, we can also find it in other types of compositions such as the National Anthem of our country or songs of popular music.

What is a verse?

The verse is the set of words ordered and subject to a series of measures, rhyme and rhythm, which causes a certain rhythmic effect in the form of a poem. The verse is made up of a set of phrases or short sentences.

The measure is determined by the number of metric syllables that each verse has, the rhyme is the coincidence that is generated between the verses from the last stressed vowel and the rhythm is what gives the verse the aesthetic effect.

The word verse comes from the Latin “versus”, which means “furrow or row” and to this they attribute the concept of “line of writing”.

A verse is the basic unit of a poem and the set of these make up the stanzas.

Characteristics of the verses

-The verse is the basic unit of a poem

-There may be rhymes between one verse and another

-They have rhythm and measure according to the number of their poetic syllables.

-The verse can be simple or compound

-The verse can be of minor art or major art

-It has a pause at the end, and in the cases of compound verses its internal pause is called caesura.

-Use stylistic resources.

Types of verses

There are different classifications of verses depending on whether they are simple or compound verses, that is, if they have internal pauses or not, or according to the number of syllables that compose it, that is, minor art or major art.

Another classification that is carried out is one that analyzes the verses according to their accentuation.

Let’s see in detail each of its classifications:

Simple and compound verses
  • Simple verses: it is a verse that has eleven syllables or less, which implies that it does not have an internal division or a pause.
  • Compound verses: are those that have more than twelve syllables, which implies that if it has a division or internal pause.
Verses of minor art and verses of major art
  • Minor art verses : are those verses that have eight syllables or less.
  • Verses of major art : it is considered to the verses that have new syllables or more.
Verses according to their accentuation:
  • Oxytone verses: those in which the final word of the verse is acute (it has the accent on the last syllable).
  • Paroxitone verses: those in which the final word is grave or flat (it has the accent on the penultimate syllable)
  • Proparoxytone and superproparoxytone verses: those in which the final word is esdrújula or is sobreesdrújula (they have the accent on the penultimate syllable)

Pauses of the verses

There are different pauses that can occur in the verses. They are:

  • Strophic pause: it is the obligatory pause that occurs at the end of the stanzas.
  • Versal pause: it is the obligatory pause that occurs at the end of the verses.
  • Censorship: it is an internal pause that is generated in the composed verses. It generates that the verse is divided into two or more hemistichs and cancels the sinalefa.
  • Internal pause: this is the name of any pause other than censorship.

Name of the verses according to their syllables

The verses have different names  depending on the number of syllables they have. Next we will see what name each one receives:

-Bisílabos (2)

-Trisyllables (3)

-Tetrasyllables (4)

-Pentasílabos (5)

-Hexasyllables (6)

-Heptasyllables (7)

-Octosyllables (8)

-Eneasyllables (9)

-Decasyllables (10)

-Endecasílabos (11)

-Dodecasyllables (12)

-Tridecasílabos (13)

-Tetradecasyllables or alexandrines (14)

-Pentadecasílabos (15)

-Hexadecasyllables (16)

-Heptadecasílabos (17)

-Octodecasílabos (18)

-Eneadecasyllables (19)

Syllabic counts of verses

The verses, when they are two or more together, can be isosyllabic, that is, they have the same number of syllables or they can be aniso-syllabic, that is, they do not have the same number of syllables.

In order to count the number of syllables that a verse has, first the type of verse must be determined according to its accentuation, that is, if it is oxytone, paroxytone or proparoxytone, and then an analysis is carried out in the way it is written each.

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