Heterogeneous mixture and homogeneous mixture

We will analyze what are the heterogeneous mixture and homogeneous mixture . In chemistry, “mixture” is defined as a set of different substances mixed together. … Similarly, while the properties of compounds are different from those of components, those of mixtures are similar to the properties of constituents. A mixture can be heterogeneous or homogeneous.

The differences between homogeneous and heterogeneous mixtures are based on the visualization of their components, the ease of separation and the conservation of properties.

 Homogeneous mixture
 Heterogeneous mixture
 DefinitionHomogeneous mixture is a uniform composition where the components are not distinguished with the naked eye.Heterogeneous mixture is an irregular composition where the components can be distinguished with the naked eye.
 Individual properties The individual properties of the substances are not maintained. The individual properties of the substances are maintained.
 Solubility Soluble components. Insoluble components.
 Visibility The components are not visible to the naked eye. The components can be seen with the naked eye.

The mixture acts, visually, as a pure compound. For example, a glass containing a solution of water and salt is indistinguishable from the naked eye from a glass containing only water.
In a heterogeneous mixture, on the other hand, it is always possible to distinguish the various components with the naked eye. Whereas in a mixture of sand and salt, the two components are always very different.

What is a homogeneous mixture:

Homogeneous mixtures or solutions are a particular type of mixture in which the molecules or ions mix so closely that the composition is uniform throughout, although the sample examined may be small.  It is not possible to distinguish individual components in a homogeneous mixture.
The mixture acts, visually, as a pure compound. For example, a glass containing a solution of water and salt, is indistinguishable to the naked eye from a glass containing only water.

Examples of homogeneous mixtures

We can name the following examples as homogeneous mixtures:

  • Water with salt
  • Vinegar with water
  • Chlorine dissolved in water
  • Ink dissolved in water
  • Water mixed with sugar
  • Powdered juice dissolved in water
  • A liquor
  • A perfume
  • A hot one

What is a smorgasbord:

Heterogeneous mixture: it is a particular type of mixture in which it is possible to recognize the various components with an optical microscope, or even with the naked eye. This is the case with many rocks or with milk or oil immersed in water, for example.

In a heterogeneous mixture, on the other hand, it is always possible to distinguish the various components with the naked eye.

Examples of heterogeneous mixture

For example, in a mixture of sand and salt, the two components are always very different. It is not possible to distinguish individual components in a homogeneous mixture.

  • A salad
  • Dressings
  • Cereal with milk
  • Oil and water
  • Concrete
  • Water and sand
  • Metal alloys
  • A rice soup

Mixes in nature

Most of the material is in the form of mixtures, consisting of substances of different composition and properties.Homogeneous mixtures and heterogeneous mixtures are present in nature.
homogeneous mixture also called a solution is a mixture composed of different substances that are mixed in a uniform way, e.g. ex. Air is made up of oxygen, CO2, nitrogen, ETC. They can be liquid or gaseous.
heterogeneous mixture is a non-uniform mixture that has composition, properties, and appearance that vary from sample to sample, such as rocks. Two granite samples will never be the same!

Mix types

Mixtures are known to be composed of two or more substances, but there are two types of mixtures that can be derived from these combinations.

  • Homogeneous mixture

In homogeneous mixtures, the conditions and properties of the compounds allow them to mix to the point that they cannot be distinguished from each other, as in the case of mayonnaise.

  • Heterogeneous mixture

In heterogeneous mixtures, the compounds that form them repel each other due to the nature of their bonds, as in the case of water and oil.

Factors that differentiate mixtures

Below are the differences between homogeneous and heterogeneous mixtures:

  • Visibility

In heterogeneous mixtures, the components that make up the mixture can be clearly seen. They are not evenly distributed.

In homogeneous mixtures, the components that make up the mixture cannot be clearly distinguished. They are evenly distributed, so that it looks like a single substance in sight.

A clear example of these two can be made with drinks. A homogeneous mixture could be a lemonade where at all points of the mixture it looks the same, while a heterogeneous mixture could be a clericot in which the fruit is still distinguishable from the rest of the liquid.

  • Separation into original components

Heterogeneous mixtures are easy to separate into their original components. If the mixture is liquid and solid, it can be filtered. Depending on the size of the solids and if it is a liquid-liquid mixture, decantation is possible.

In homogeneous mixtures, mixtures are difficult to separate into their original components. The best known method for a liquid-liquid mixture is by distillation. At an industrial level there is also distillation, but there are also methods such as absorption, membrane separation, among others.

  • Individual properties

Each component of a heterogeneous mixture retains its individual properties because they are still dispersed.Each part of a homogeneous mixture has similar chemical and physical properties. An example of this can be water and salt.

Water alone does not conduct electricity, but when a certain amount of solute is added, in this case salt, a homogeneous mixture is formed with the physical ability to conduct electricity.

  • Solubility

All chemical solutions are examples of homogeneous mixtures. There is a complete part of analytical chemistry that is devoted to the study of these types of mixtures based on their concentrations, solubility constants, and other terms.

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